Question: Are blue eyes more likely to get cataracts?

What color eyes are more prone to cataracts?

People with dark brown eyes have the greatest risk of developing cataracts. An Australian study found that the risk can be up to 2.5 times greater for certain types of cataracts. Researchers suspect the reason is similar to wearing a black shirt in the middle of summer.

Are blue eyes more likely to go blind?

Because blue eyes contain less melanin than most other eye colors, they may be more at risk of certain damage. Research has shown that lighter iris colors are associated with: A higher risk of ocular uveal melanoma (a type of eye cancer)

What is the healthiest eye color?

If you have brown eyes, you’ll be happy to know they have been associated with some health benefits. People with brown eyes may be less vulnerable to certain diseases. For example, people with brown eyes appear less likely to develop age-related macular degeneration than people with light-colored eyes.

When is cataract surgery not recommended?

For example, if you have advanced macular degeneration or a detached retina as well as cataracts, it’s possible that removing the cataract and replacing it with a clear intraocular lens (IOL) might not improve your eyesight. In such cases, cataract surgery may not be recommended.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Quick Answer: Are there contacts for astigmatism and presbyopia?

Who is most likely to get cataracts?

How common are cataracts? Cataracts are common among older people. More than 50% of people age 80 and older have had cataracts.

Do cataracts change the color of your eyes?

The lenses in your eyes can become yellowish or brownish when you have cataracts. As a result, you view the world through tinted lenses. Everything can look more faded to you when you have cataracts than it does for people without them. After having cataract surgery, many patients notice that colors are brighter.

Why are blue eyes becoming more rare?

Blue eyes are indeed becoming less common in the world. One study showed that about 100 years ago, half of U.S. residents had blue eyes. … Another reason blue eyes are declining is because they were at an artificially high level before. In the past, blue-eyed people tended to have kids with other blue-eyed people.

Are blue eyes a defect?

Scientists have tracked down a genetic mutation which took place 6,000-10,000 years ago and is the cause of the eye color of all blue-eyed humans alive on the planet today.