Best answer: Is cataract surgery more difficult after LASIK?

Does LASIK surgery affect cataract surgery?

Yes, cataract surgery can be performed after LASIK. In fact, cataract surgery can be performed after any type of laser vision correction procedure, including LASIK, PRK, Epi-LASIK and LASEK. LASIK and other types of laser vision correction alter the curvature of the front surface of the eye (cornea).

Can vision get worse again after LASIK?

See your doctor right away if any of the following happens after LASIK: new symptoms develop. vision gets worse (beyond the normal haziness/blurriness that occurs after the procedure)

Does laser eye surgery prevent cataracts?

The answer is quite simply: yes, you can. While LASIK treats the cornea, cataract surgery treats and replaces the lens within the eye. Translation: one will not prevent the other from being possible.

What is the difference between laser eye surgery and cataract surgery?

What is the difference between cataract surgery and LASIK?” Essentially, cataract surgery involves removal of the lens and placement of an artificial lens while LASIK involves reshaping of the cornea.

Can LASIK go wrong?

Surgical complications from laser vision correction are extremely rare. But they do occur. LASIK complications include infections as well as dislocation of the corneal flap that’s made during the surgery.

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What are the disadvantages of laser cataract surgery?

The major disadvantages of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery are high cost of the laser and the disposables for surgery, femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery-specific intraoperative capsular complications, as well as the risk of intraoperative miosis and the learning curve.

Can Apple cider vinegar cure cataracts?

You may find references to apple cider vinegar for cataracts. Again, this is a home remedy that has no proven effectiveness. It could help because apples contain antioxidants, which are generally good for eye health, but the lack of scientific evidence is cause for caution.

What can go wrong with lens replacement?

Refractive lens exchange risks and complications include:

  1. Retinal detachment, especially in extremely nearsighted people.
  2. Dislocated IOL.
  3. Increased eye pressure (ocular hypertension)
  4. Infection or bleeding inside the eye.
  5. Droopy eyelid (ptosis)
  6. Glare, halos and blurry vision from multifocal IOLs.